4 tips for developing young coaches

 

1.     Actually lift yourself

 

How are you going to coach a movement if you don’t know how to do it? How is an athlete meant to trust if you if you cant even do it yourself? Spend some time actually training yourself and learning what each movement feels like. Become well versed in all things strength & conditioning. Practice: strength, speed, power, agility, activation and all aspects of performance coaching! If you don’t understand any of these components ask someone who does, simple! There’s heaps of coaches out there that know how to do the big 3 but there isn’t many who can throw it all together, become a jack of all trades and expand your freaking tool box! One way isn’t the best way, you’re way isn’t the best way! There’s many ways to skin a cat.

 

2.     Study, learn and practice

 

It goes without saying; you always need to be learning and growing, if you’re not learning you’re going backwards. In this day and age you can’t just rely on your current knowledge base to be getting through. Things in the industry change so fast! There are some commonalities between the best in the business and they all continue there education. If doesn’t have to be S&C specific 100% of the time, if you’re learning about: mindset, nutrition, psychology, business or another topic that’s ok! You’re going forward and not backwards.

 

3.     Start personal training

 

You’ll be better than some muppet out there, have a crack, get results and learn how to apply the science onto gen pop and go from there. With no practical experience you are nowhere, being a good coach doesn’t happen overnight and I can guarantee that most people started personal training gen pop and grew it from there. Lets face it, Australia doesn’t have nearly the amount of athletes that the states does, you wont get near a real athlete for a while but when you do at least you’ll be prepared. Nobody likes a science geek that can’t coach to save his life.

 

4.     Don’t call yourself an S&C/performance coach if you’re not one.

 

Self-explanatory

 

Let me know what you think

 

Tim Frey

 

tim@helixsp.com

 

Like/Share/Comment

Comment